The Ancient Roman calendar

The first Roman calendar was established by the first Roman king Romulus in 753 BC. In particular there were 10 months and the whole year was 304 days long. There were 61 wintry days that were not allocated to any month; simply the Romans would stop counting the days after December, starting to count the days again in March, which was the first month of the year. calendario

To be more precise, the months were:

Martius. It was 31 days long and it was named after Mars, the god of war.

Aprilis. It was 30 days long and it was named for Apro, who was the translation for Aphrodite, the god of love and beauty.

Maius. It was 31 days long and it was dedicated to Maia, the goddess of fertility.

Iunius. It was 30 days long and it was named after Juno, the goddess of procreation.

Quintilis. It was 31 days long and it was named for being the 5th month of the year.

Sextilis. It was 30 days long and it was named for being the 6th month of the year.

September. It was 30 days long and it was named for being the 7h month of the year.

October. It was 31 days long and it was named for being the 8th month of the year.

November. It was 30 days long and it was named for being the 9th month of the year.

December. It was 30 days long and it was named for being the 10th month of the year.

Surprisingly, many months have the same names nowadays.

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